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Philips launches DirectLife, a new personal fitness program

Royal Philips ElectronicsPhilips is delivering on their commitment to be the leader in health and well-being with the launch of Philips DirectLife, a new customized, interactive fitness program that offers a fun and simple solution to people eager to adopt a more active lifestyle. The DirectLife program was borne out of a desire to directly appeal to the more than 60 percent of the global population who fail to reach the minimum levels of moderate daily physical activity to deliver health benefits, as recommended by the World Health Organization.[1]

DirectLife records a person's daily movements via a discreet, wearable state-of-the-art Activity Monitor which tracks both the duration and intensity of a user's daily activity. Information is then easily transferred in one simple step via USB to a personal web page that keeps track of progress against both daily targets and longer term goals. The program offers a number of unique features, including a personal coach to help people set balanced and achievable goals, provide individual feedback and deliver advice on how to make easy healthy lifestyle changes, some in as little as a few minutes a day.

It is the use of all three mechanisms of support together - monitoring, measuring and motivating through a personal coach - which Philips DirectLife believes will lead to healthier everyday decisions and longer lasting, more active lifestyle change.

Features include:

  • A small, lightweight and waterproof Activity Monitor that records daily movements using 3D digital accelerometer technology
  • Online personal coaches to give that extra push when needed, with expertise in sport science, personal training and behavioral psychology
  • A personal web page that provides stats, tips, activity ideas and allows participants to track themselves amongst family and friends and anonymously against other users
  • A personalized activity plan, with realistic goals
  • Weekly feedback summaries by e-mail

"The DirectLife approach is based on a shift in focus towards a more active everyday life, becoming fit through more consistent activity versus exercise alone," said Jennifer Dowdeswell, one of the full time Philips DirectLife Coaches with extensive health and fitness experience.

"With DirectLife people learn that being active doesn’t just have to mean a daily gym routine. For most people even adding more activity and movement into their daily lives can make a big difference - such as going for a walk, taking the stairs, or dancing with the kids."

Philips is also working closely with corporations to highlight how employee health and well-being programs including DirectLife also makes good business sense.

"Leadership in corporations and institutions are recognizing that they need to change the way wellness is addressed," said Erik de Heus, CEO, Wellness Solutions, Philips Electronics.

"Physical activity is increasingly being seen as the core component of a balanced corporate wellness plan, and DirectLife addresses this significant opportunity with an innovative solution combining the best of smart technology and personalized coaching."

Increasing employee activity levels offers a number of benefits including:

  • A healthier workforce. The Surgeon General's report states that Americans can substantially improve their health and quality of life by including moderate amounts of physical activity in their daily lives, which leads to a lower risk for coronary heart diseases, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.[2]
  • Cost Savings. Studies show a cost saving effect from the DirectLife physical activity program. An active workforce is associated with lower levels of absenteeism and health care costs.[3] 27 percent of national healthcare charges for individuals aged 40 or older are associated with physical inactivity, being overweight and obese.[4]
  • Increased employee productivity. Physical activity programs in the workplace improve job satisfaction which leads to improved energy levels, employee morale, productivity and job attitude.[5-6] Regular physical activity also allows daily tasks to be accomplished with greater ease and comfort due to less fatigue.[7]

DirectLife is now available for consumers at www.philips.com/directlife for an initial fee of $99 plus shipping (includes Activity Monitor and first four months of membership). Standard membership fees are $12.50 per month, which include personalized communication with an expert coach. For more information, visit www.philips.com/directlife.

About Royal Philips Electronics
Royal Philips Electronics of the Netherlands (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHI) is a diversified Health and Well-being company, focused on improving people's lives through timely innovations. As a world leader in healthcare, lifestyle and lighting, Philips integrates technologies and design into people-centric solutions, based on fundamental customer insights and the brand promise of "sense and simplicity". Headquartered in the Netherlands, Philips employs more than 118,000 employees in more than 60 countries worldwide. With sales of EUR 26 billion in 2008, the company is a market leader in cardiac care, acute care and home healthcare, energy efficient lighting solutions and new lighting applications, as well as lifestyle products for personal well-being and pleasure with strong leadership positions in flat TV, male shaving and grooming, portable entertainment and oral healthcare. News from Philips is located at www.philips.com/newscenter.

1. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_inactivity/en/index.html
2. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity and Health: A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Georgia: USDHSS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1996
3. Aldana SG et al. Financial impact of a comprehensive multisite workplace health promotion program. Preventive medicine 2005:131-137
4. Anderson LH, Martinson BC, Crain AL, Pronk NP, Whitebird RR, Fine LJ, et al. Health care charges associated with physical inactivity, overweight, and obesity. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2005 Oct [date cited]. Available from: URL:http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2005/oct/04_0118.htm.
5. Elias WS, Murphy RJ. The case for health promotion programs containing health care costs: a review of the literature. Am J Occup Ther. 1986 40:759-63
6. Physical activity & health U.S A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionThe President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports 1996 URL: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/sgr/pdf/sgrfull.pdf
7. Wagner EH, LaCroix AZ, Buchner DM, Larson EB. Effects of physical activity on health status in older adults. I: Observational studies. Annu Rev Public Health. 1992 13:451-68.